I’ve wrecked my train

In the years of March 2011 – January 2017 I ate a total of 2 doughnuts.  I ate 2 doughnuts this past Friday. I ate 2 doughnuts on Thursday. I ate 2 doughnuts and a bear claw on Wednesday.  I’ve eaten doughnuts all darn year.  Every time I ate one I told myself not to eat it, but I did it anyway.  I didn’t take myself seriously when I said not to.  You see, food is my drug of choice. Doughnuts is a symbol of my struggle.  I push back against the words “food addiction”.  However, yes, I am a food addict.   Foods with the combo of sugar, fat and flour are my drugs.   There is no such thing as “moderation” when it comes to drugs so why do we try to fool ourselves into thinking we can let the food that doesn’t serve us well into our lives.

You see, I had it under control.  I lulled myself into thinking I could let up off the brake and give it a little gas.  I do see that some difficult, stressful life situations pulled me back and I allowed it. Oh.. it was slow.   A little more gas here and there until BAM! I’ve wrecked my train.

I do see things that occurred in my young life from about the age of 4 through my teens that started me on the path of an unhealthy relationship with food.  If I allow myself to peel back the curtain and take a look, I know. It isn’t easy to look, but it’s important to do so.  It is also important not to allow those things to control you and your relationship with food for your entire life.  We do have the power to choose and take control. However, often we must take an unvarnished look at the whys, own up to the reality and choose to move forward with some positive action. We cannot stay in “victim mode”.  To do so relinquishes too much power.

So here I am a few days shy of age 54 and I’m finding myself fighting the same battle – again.  I’m armed with lots of education, history and knowledge of what I need to do, what I must do, what I have successfully done in the past.  Now I must implement it.  Is it easy?  Heck no. Is it possible?  Heck yes.  Is it difficult in terms of complexity?  No. Does it require effort to consistently execute?  Of course.   Worth it?  Oh yes.  Giving up because I wrecked my train?  Oh No!  Blaming anyone or anything else but myself? Nope.  Victim mode is not engaged.  Am I beautiful, smart and worthy of love just the way I am?  Of course.  Blinders on to being fatter than I want and need to be and needing to course correct?  No way.

Are your blinders on?

If you need support, guidance and professional assistance then GET IT.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG.  Get After It.

 

Why SQUATS Should be in Your Life

SQUATS.   If you’re looking for a powerful way to boost your overall fitness and health, look no further than the squat. This is one exercise that should be a part of virtually everyone’s routine. The squat is relatively simple to perform, requires no or very minimal equipment, and can be done just about anywhere.

WHY are they so good?

Builds Muscle in Your Entire Body

Squats work the two biggest muscle groups in your body: the glutes and the quads. Assistance movers for this exercise include the hamstrings and the calves. Squats also help build lower back strength and develop core strength and stabilization. Squats are a functional exercise in that they aid your ability to live a full, healthy life. Anything from getting out of a chair, to squatting down to pick something off the floor requires squat strength. Especially as we get older, proper squat technique is critical to maintain health and longevity.  There are many variations to this very effective compound exercise.

Functional Exercise Makes Real-Life Activities Easier

Functional exercises are those that help your body to perform real-life activities.  Squats are one of the best functional exercises out there, as humans have been squatting since the hunter-gatherer days. When you perform squats, you build muscle and help your muscles work more efficiently, as well as promote mobility and balance.

Increase your Metabolism

One of the most time-efficient ways to raise your metabolism is to have more muscle. Muscle is active tissue and it requires more energy (calories) to maintain throughout the day – even when at rest or sleeping.

Maintain Mobility and Balance

Strong legs are crucial for staying mobile as you get older, and squats are excellent for increasing leg strength. They also work out your core, stabilizing muscles, which will help you to maintain balance, while also improving the communication between your brain and your muscle groups, which helps prevent falls – which is the #1 way to prevent bone fractures.

Prevent Injuries

Most athletic injuries involve weak stabilizer muscles, ligaments and connective tissues, which squats help strengthen. They also help prevent injury by improving your flexibility and balance.  If you can prevent a fall, you’ve prevented a potentially serious injury – especially as we age.

Prevent Disease

Few exercises work as many muscles as the squat, so it’s an excellent activity useful for toning and tightening your buttocks, abdominals, and your legs. These muscles participate in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity, helping to protect you against obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regular exercise is a key player in disease reduction, optimal mental, emotional and physical health, and longevity. Exercise also slows down the rate of aging itself, even stimulating the regeneration of the energy-producing mitochondria in your cells, providing perhaps the closest example of a real-life fountain of youth as we will ever find.

Prevent / Improve Osteoporosis [Increase Bone Density]

Osteoporosis and osteopenia are both characterized by low bone density. Areas that post-menopausal women are most affected by loss of bone density is in their femoral neck (near the top of the femur), hips and spine. Osteoporosis is often called a silent disease because bone loss occurs without symptoms. People may not know that they have osteoporosis until their bones become so weak that a sudden strain, bump, or fall causes a fracture. Collapsed vertebrae may be first noticed when the person suffers severe back pain, loss of height, or spinal deformities such as stooped posture. The creation of new bone, and how dense, strong, and well-rounded it is in content can be at least partially manipulated by our activities. Weighted squats are an excellent exercise to improve bone density in the femoral neck,  hips and lower spine.

HOW DO YOU GET AFTER IT?

The bodyweight squat (squatting without weights) incorporates elements of resistance training because you’re lifting your own body weight. Using added weight (with a front squat variation such as a Goblet or Zercher squat) increases the intensity of the workout , which builds muscle, accelerates your metabolism and strengthens bone density.

Athletic Stance.  Knees are slightly bent, feet are firmly planted on the ground, and toes pointed outwards slightly, which helps with stabilization. The wider you put your feet, the more it works your glutes and hamstring (back of the leg), and the easier it will be to stabilize. The closer in you put your feet, the more your quadriceps will be emphasized (the front of the leg).

Head Neutral – Straight Ahead.   Pick a spot on the wall that’s in line with your eyes as you are standing straight, then as you squat down, keep your eyes on that spot. Your head is automatically in the correct position.

Back Straight. Chest Out – Shoulders Back.   By keeping your shoulders back and your chest out, your lower back will most likely have the correct natural curve.

Butt Back – Sit Down.  Knees behind your Toes. Weight on Heels.  Each time you squat you should hinge your hips so that your butt moves backwards during the downward phase of the squat, your knees should NOT be over your toes (if you are tall, this may happen, but make sure it does not put pressure on your knees). Finally, the pressure of the squat will be on your heels instead of your toes and you will be able to get more depth to your squat.

Practice your form with squats using a bench, ottoman or a chair behind you to sit down – squat to.   The depth of your squat (how low should you go): In general, try to shoot for your hamstrings about parallel with the floor, which deeply engages your thighs, hips, and glutes. If you can go lower than parallel that’s fine, just make sure you don’t experience any pain in your knees, or lower back, and always keep your lower back flat, to slightly arched.

 

Why Women Need to Strength Train

Muscle. I’m sure you’ve heard of it.  Do you think about it? Do you realize why it is so important?  Muscle is not just for bodybuilders and athletes.  It is for everyone.   It is vitally important for women.  Muscle is critical for our health, our functional strength, our ability to do day-to-day activities, and our body composition. More accurately, it is critical if we want to be leaner – less fat with more fat-free/lean mass.

Why Should Women Strength Train?

  • Improve / Maintain muscle strength
  • Improve / Maintain coordination
  • Improve / Maintain balance
    • These 3 things together help to prevent falls & related fractures
    • These 3 things together allow us to perform everyday activities
  • Strengthen our bone mass – bone density and strength
      • Decreased bone density = osteoporosis and fractures
  • Change our body composition to one that is leaner and less fat
      • Body composition (body fat – lean body mass %) Weighing less on the scale won’t necessarily get us a lower body fat %, in fact, we can have higher body fat & less lean body mass when we simply aim to lose weight.

Fat is what we need to keep our eye on; reducing fat so that we have more fat-free mass than fat- no matter what we weigh.   Fat and weight sometimes coincide, but they are different.   Our bodyweight is a reflection of our relationship with gravity and our weight includes our bones, organs, muscle, blood, fat and water.  Our bodies are more than 60% water.  Our bodyweight varies throughout the day and it varies day by day and week by week mainly due to a big variable:  Water.  When you weigh yourself you are getting all that information.  If your bones are stronger due to a resistance training program then they are stronger and heavier.  We want and need that kind of weight.

Let’s talk muscle.  Typically, when we talk about Muscle, we are referring to skeletal muscle.  There are 3 types of Muscle – Skeletal, Smooth and Cardiac.  Skeletal muscle is a series of muscle that moves the skeleton.  The nervous system is the control center for movement production, and the skeletal system provides the structural framework for our bodies. To complete a cycle of movement production, the body must have a device that the nervous system can command to move the skeletal system and that is the muscular system.  Muscles generate internal tension which manipulates the bones of our body to produce movements.  Muscles are the movers and stabilizers of our bodies.   Tendons are the structures that attach muscles to bone and provide the anchor from which the muscle can exert force and control the bone and joint.  Ligaments connect bone to bone, provide stability and input to the nervous system.  Muscle, just like Bone, is living tissue.  Muscle needs calories and stimulation via exercise to maintain and grow.  The stronger and fitter our muscles are the Better we are.

Exercising and Training are different.  Training takes us out of our comfort zone and it is designed to build brick-upon-brick of your foundation of strength. Working in a way that stimulates and continually challenges our muscles is what strength (resistance) training is.  True strength training isn’t aerobic exercise with weights.  Strength training is using resistance that keeps our muscles under tension and it is training that is progressive.   Without challenge and without progression – we are exercising, not strength training.  There are many tools to use for strength training: Bodyweight, resistance bands, barbells, dumbbells, kettlebells, sandbags, etc.  There are techniques and tools that are utilized in progressive & periodized training such as Supersets, Combinations, Complexes, Circuits, Eccentrics and Cardio Intervals.  For the beginner, it is about learning basic compound exercises with good form and building a foundation of stability and strength to build upon.

We all should be builders of our bodies. We only have one so shouldn’t we build it to be as strong, healthy & functional as possible?   To have stability, balance and mobility- we need our muscles.  To do everyday activities with independence and reduced risk of injury – we need our muscles.  To have the body composition we want – we need our muscles.   Don’t have fear of morphing into a rippled muscle bound “bodybuilder” if that isn’t what you want.  Believe me – that doesn’t happen easily or casually.   Becoming a builder of your body = Smart.

When it comes to fighting obesity which is about having less fat – we need our muscle.  Muscles need calories; Muscles shape and define our bodies; Muscles move our bodies and keep us balanced and coordinated.   Be aware that many weight loss plans are detrimental to our muscles, our bones, our metabolism and our health.  If we take care of our muscles we can become fat-burning machines as a normal course of business; we will have stronger bones; we will have a good framework for our bodies that will improve our functional strength, balance and coordination.  And yes –look pretty darn FABulous.

Maintain a nutritious diet that keeps you thriving, don’t lead a sedentary lifestyle and have strength training in your life – Do it for the Health of It.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG. Get After It.

How I Want To Change The World

“The ones who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones that do” ~ Anonymous

In what crazy way do I want to change the world?  This question was posed to me in a class I was taking and I answered it this way:

I want to change the world by empowering women over 50 to become stronger physically and emotionally by embracing and loving themselves in the here and now while transforming themselves to be the very best that they want to be while serving as agents of change for younger women.

As a younger woman, I really didn’t give it much thought.  “IT” being my contribution; how I may be able to make a difference in the world.  If I gave it any thought, it was fleeting or maybe I just don’t remember it since I was so busy getting my feet on the ground and wading through life.  Having strong women as mentors and guides to provide straight-up, real wisdom is so important.  Do we get enough?  All too often – no, we don’t.  Not because it isn’t out there, but perhaps it’s because of lack of access or the ability to tap into it.  With that said, I did have some amazing women when I was younger, after my mom died when I was 17, who provided me with much insight, humor, knowledge, love and glimpses at how the world works.  Our experiences in life and how we navigate through them shape us and mold us into the women we become.  Being willing and able to share our knowledge – to hand it down and pay it forward – that is where it’s at.   How can we create that circle?  That circle of love, light, knowledge and empowerment?

Maybe it starts with No Fear. Casting outside our hesitation, our Fear if you would, of opening ourselves up and sharing.  Sharing our experiences and be willing to be those mentors and guides through our actions and our words and making sure we are accessible and available.  It takes a village.  Luckily, we have a very big village; a village that encompasses neighborhoods, cities, states, regions and countries.  A village that now has very few walls thanks to technology which serves to make the very large world not such a big place after all.  It is indeed a very small world sometimes.  What experience or experiences in your life could someone else learn from, gain comfort from, gain No Fear from?  If you’ve made it through – they can too.  How did you make it through?  What did you learn from it?  Did you cry? Did you laugh? What would you do again? What would you do differently?  Often it’s not so much the content of your sharing, but the fact that you are.  My parents instilled in me many things, but the one lesson I consider to be my foundation: That I can do ANYTHING that I set my mind to.  Despite that foundation, I struggle with nagging fears and doubts sometimes and it is always so awesome to have someone that I can talk to and get my feet back underneath me again.  We all need more of that.

When I answered the question of how I want to change the world: I did so intuitively. The answer that came out is what immediately hit my mind and my fingers to type.  As I’ve reflected on it, I realize that the answer is way bigger in scope than I can even wrap my arms around and communicate effectively.  Then, it happened. I got my answer. I got my answer on how to proceed to finish up this train of thought.  It came in the form of an email.  Let me share it with you.  The subject line of the email was: OMG! I Feel So Empowered.

I grew up in the middle of the “modern feminist movement.” I guess you could call me a woman’s libber. It was a time of fighting for “equal pay for equal work” and Billie Jean King’s victory over Bobby Riggs. For most of my life I’ve felt like I was a strong woman, pretty independent. The one area in my life I have never felt good about is the way I look. I’ve always felt I was too fat, too short, too this, too that.  

I have seen woman become more and more empowered, yet our young women still struggle with self-image/esteem issues. We are judgmental creatures. We assign labels: ‘the pretty one’ or the smart one’. For me it was ‘the fat one’. I have fought this label all my life.

 Today for the first time in my entire life I can confidently say “I am a strong, independent, beautiful woman!” I refuse to listen to negative self-talk. If I could go back and talk to my younger self, I would tell her she is looking good. I would encourage her to eat a healthy diet, with lots of foods that will fuel that powerful wonderful body she has. I would teach her how to lift weights so she will have strong muscles throughout her life. I would encourage her to do or be whatever she wanted, not what others thought she should or could. 

You see, it was “just” a Deadlift.  The woman who wrote me that email pulled her first set of deadlifts earlier that afternoon.  I taught her to do that.  By doing that, she found her strength; her inner power. She got in touch with part of her that had been locked away inside. She stripped away a label that she had worn her entire life.  She now feels that she can do anything that she sets her mind to doing.

I want to give as many women as possible that experience – the experience of discovering their own beauty, their strength, their power, their confidence and their ability to change the world.  We can all change the world starting with our little chunk of it.  If girls could grow into women with the knowledge that they are a total package and can absolutely do anything that they set their minds to; that they are not just their body, their hair, the clothes they wear or the love interests that they attract – how totally amazing would that be?

Life.  It is going on Now.  It is your body & your life, so ROCK IT OUT.

Deadlift.  Definitely deadlift.  I want to teach any woman, no matter her age, how to Deadlift.   Changing the world starting with my little chunk of it.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG. Get After It.

“To acquire true self power you have to feel beneath no one, be immune to criticism and be fearless” ―       Deepak Chopra