CABBAGE is King

I see you!  You snurled up your nose.  Stop it – do you want your face to freeze up like that?  Seriously – I used to do the same thing.  The only way I had experienced cabbage was either drenched in mayonnaise in coleslaw or mushy-smelly cooked cabbage from my grandmother and my elementary school cafeteria.  No Thanks – I pass.  Then something awesome happened not too long ago.  I threw some in a hot cast iron skillet with some olive oil, some chopped jalapenos, a dash of garlic, pepper & salt and it was MAGIC in my bowl.   Yep.  I quickly stir fried it up. No yucky smell.  No mush.  Crisp-tender. Pure awesomeness.  Come to find out – the smell comes from overcooking; which the cafeteria ladies and my granny always did.  Since that time I’ve mixed it all up and the options are only limited by your imagination and what you have lying about in your fridge. Peppers. Ground beef. Smoked Sausage. Chicken. Spinach. Onions. Sriracha sauce. Whatever strikes your fancy and sounds good to you!

You may be thinking, but Jen!  It’s boring and how can it be good for you since it is so plain? As it turns out, it is a nutritional powerhouse.  An inexpensive nutritional powerhouse.

In the world of vegetables, the brassica family is true royalty.  The reigning king of the brood – which includes broccoli, kohlrabi, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and chard, is the Cabbage.   The cabbage family is royalty due to its nutritional benefits and cancer-fighting ability.  Oh yea – it is also one of the lowest-calorie foods on the planet.

  • Phytonutrients
    • indoles (alter estrogen metabolism in a way that is likely to reduce the risk of cancer)
    • dithiolethiones
    • isothiocynates
    • sulforaphane (a particularly potent phytonutrient that can aid in “disarming” damaging free radicals and help fight carcinogens)
  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin K
  • beta-carotene
  • a wee bit of the eye-healthy carotenoids – lutein & zeaxanthin
  • FIBER (4g per cup of cooked; 2g per cup raw)

Cabbage is indeed a nutritional powerhouse.  It is versatile, delicious (especially with spices to Oomph it up), low-calorie, and high fiber.  On top of all that it has powerful phytonutrients that can help kick bad stuff to the curb (Mother Nature’s food IS medicine).

Grab yourself a skillet, a bit of oil, some spices, some random stuff from your fridge and make yourself some Royal food – Cabbage.  It’s King – who knew?  And that is healthy eating.   Eating healthy means you are eating food that has nutrients and supports health and keeps us thriving, not just surviving.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG. Get After It!

Note:  Many members of the cabbage family contain goitrogens, naturally occurring substances that may interfere with thyroid function. People with hypothyroidism may be wise to consume moderately & confer with a registered dietician

 

Blackberry Oatmeal Muffins

Love muffins, but want something healthier with fiber, some protein and less sugar?  I’ve got you covered.  Give these a try!

Grab a bowl and a spoon & whip up a batch; can use any berry such as blackberry, raspberry, blueberry or mulberry.

1 cup all-purpose flour (or use ½ cup whole wheat & ½ cup all purpose)

1 cup old-fashioned oats

1 TB baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 cup brown sugar

1 cup blackberries (cut in halves or thirds)

1 egg

5 oz container plain or vanilla Greek or Icelandic yogurt

Handful of chopped walnuts

GENTLY mix until blended together. Spoon into 12 muffin tins lined with foil baking cup liners.

Bake at 350 for approximately 20 minute +/- depending on your oven.

Stay HEALTHY. Be STRONG.  Get AFTER IT. 

 

Exercise As We Age

In my last blog, I shared with you the importance of nutrition, particularly protein, to support our functional strength as we age.   Maintaining good functional strength is important to a goal of being able to Age in Place, which is the ability to live in your own home and community safely, independently and comfortably.

Age related loss of muscle mass and function is called sarcopenia. Muscle is key to motion. As we age, significant changes in muscle mass and quality take place. After about age 50, muscle mass decreases at an annual rate of 1–2%. The decline in muscle strength is even higher, amounting to 1.5% per year between ages 50 and 60 and 3% per year thereafter.  Of those 65 and older, 16 to 18 percent of women and eight to 10 percent of men in the United States cannot lift ten pounds, bend forward to pick something up off the ground or kneel to the floor. After the age of 75, this increases to 66 percent of women and 28 percent of men being unable to lift more than ten pounds.

 Muscle strength is strongly correlated to physical independence and fall prevention. Loss of muscle mass and strength is related to functional impairment and an increased risk for a fall. Leg strength, particularly the ability to rise from a chair, has been found to be a major predictor of frailty and mortality. Leg strength and walking gait speed are two variables predicting fall risk. Additionally, muscular endurance necessary to maintain balance under multi-task conditions such as cooking, gardening or recreational activities, and the importance of muscular power in reactive balance such as slipping on ice or tripping over a curb are important fall risk factors in older adults.

What makes the biggest difference in our skeletal muscle mass and strength?  Exercise.  Specifically, weight bearing and resistance-based exercise which also improve our bone density and decrease our risk of osteoporosis.   Weight bearing exercise are activities that force you to work against gravity. Examples are walking, hiking, climbing stairs, playing tennis or golf (walk don’t ride a cart!), and dancing.   Exercise such as riding a bicycle is a weight supportive exercise.  The bicycle supports our weight.  While bicycling isn’t weight bearing exercise, we are using our largest skeletal muscles to power the bicycle.

Resistance-based exercise is also known as strength training.  Strength training is any exercise that causes the muscles to contract against an external resistance. Resistance-based exercises increase strength, mass and endurance depending on how the exercises are performed.  The external resistance can be dumbbells, rubber exercise tubing or flat loop bands, your own bodyweight or any object that causes the muscle to contract. There are three movements of any resistance-based exercise:  concentric, isometric and eccentric.  Knowing how to utilize these movements properly, how much weight-resistance is used, the tempo of the exercise, and using proper technique to avoid injury and maximize effectiveness relative to your specific goals.  Training techniques differ for strength gains, muscle mass and muscle endurance.  For functional health, older adults need to focus on strength, muscle mass and muscular endurance.  While most everyone can implement a walking program into their life without any type of special training or guidance, I highly recommend guidance from a qualified therapist or a trainer who specializes in senior fitness. SilverSneakers® is a good source for exercise modalities for senior adults.   They have a website and a Facebook page where free information is provided to anyone and if you are a member (available through many Medicare Advantage Plans) you can attend SilverSneakers® classes for free or minimal cost if you are not a member.  I personally lead two SilverSneakers® classes every week.  An online resource I recommend is ElderGym.com  that provides quality information and free senior workout programs that can be performed at home, outdoors or in a gym.

Stay Healthy. Be Strong. Get After It.

How CHERRIES can impact your Health

Cherries. They are beautiful.  They are cheery little morsels that are sweet, but also tart.  Have you ever thought about how a handful of cherries per day could be a dose of medicine that you are missing out on?

As Hippocrates said: “Let food by thy medicine and let medicine by thy food”. 

Cherries are loaded with antioxidants.  Tart cherries have properties that are different, and often more potent, than sweet cherries.  Sweet cherries can be a delicious lower glycemic load snack (important for diabetics and others with insulin resistance), but when it comes to supplementing your diet with cherry juice, make it tart!

Tart cherries have long been used as a natural pain killer and are particularly effective against gout. Scientists believe that compounds in the cherries called anthocyanins are responsible for the effect. Cherries have been shown to lower levels of uric acid in the blood which is one of the most common causes of gout pain. Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis triggered by high levels of uric acid in the blood.  Look for tart cherry juice at the grocery or health food store (Knudsen is a common brand) and get in the habit of having a small glass each day. Tart cherry juice is, well you know: Tart. It is straight up juice, no added sugar or other ingredients.  I like it chilled and I drink it from a juice glass. I’ve been working with a gentleman for a few years now as his health coach and he hasn’t had a flare up of gout since he added tart cherry juice to his daily routine.

Anthocyanins from cherries are also highly anti-inflammatoryConsuming them on a regular basis may help lower the risk for heart attack, stroke and even colon cancer.

In addition to cherries, foods that are rich in anthocyanins include blueberries, blackberries, purple carrots and pomegranate juice.  The richer the color of the fruit or vegetable, the greater likelihood it’s loaded with the health-giving compounds.

Osteoarthritis and Muscle Pain.  These are ailments that I struggle with and I’m betting many of you reading this also feel the same pain.    A cup and a half of tart cherries or one cup of tart cherry juice daily can reduce joint pain of osteoarthritis and muscle inflammation and soreness.

What are some other benefits of adding cherries, specifically tart cherries and tart cherry juice to your diet?

  • Can help you sleep better. Drink cherry juice 30 minutes after waking and 30 minutes before your evening meal to boost melatonin. Cherries are a good source of melatonin and have also been found to help with jet lag.  There is a higher level of melatonin in tart cherries compared to sweet cherries.
  • The Alzheimer’s Association includes cherries as one of the memory boosting foods because they are rich in antioxidants.
  • May reduce the risk of stroke. Tart cherries provide cardiovascular benefits. The anthocyanins may activate PPAR which regulates genes involved in fat and glucose metabolism and thus, reduce risk factors for high cholesterol, blood pressure and diabetes.
  • Improve the aging of our skin. Cherries and their high antioxidant level help the body fight the aging process.
  • Help regulate heart rate and blood pressure. The phytosterols in cherries help reduce bad (LDL) cholesterol levels.

I don’t know about you, but that is a lot to Cheer about. Why don’t you head out to find yourself a jar of tart cherry juice and put it in your fridge to chill.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG.  Get After It.

 

I share my thoughts with you to provide information and food for thought aka pondering. Pondering which will lead to more reading, education and Eureka! moments. However, please don’t take it as medical advice. It isn’t. If you have a medical condition, or suspect you have one, always seek care from a licensed medical professional. That way — it’s all BAMtastic! 

Does GOUT got you down?

Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis triggered by high levels of uric acid in the blood.  Gout causes swollen, red, hot and stiff joints. Normally, uric acid dissolves in the blood. It passes through the kidneys and out of the body in urine. But sometimes uric acid can build up and form needle-like crystals. When they form in your joints, it is very painful. The crystals can also cause kidney stones.   Often, gout first attacks your big toe. It can also attack ankles, heels, knees, wrists, fingers, and elbows. At first, gout attacks usually get better in days. Eventually, attacks last longer and happen more often.

You are more likely to get gout if you:

  • Are a man
  • Have family member with gout
  • Are overweight
  • Have had gastric bypass surgery
  • Drink alcohol and beer
  • Eat too many foods rich in purines *
    •  Purines are in our body’s tissues and some foods are high in purines such as  organ meats, red meat, wild game and some seafood

Overall nutrition-diet goals for Gout:

  • Achieve a healthier weight and good eating habits
  • Avoid some, but not all, foods with purines
  • Include foods that can control uric acid levels

As Hippocrates said: “Let food by thy medicine and let medicine by thy food”. 

Nutrition recommendations for Gout sufferers:

  • Drink plenty of water as your “go to” beverage
  • Avoid organ meats and wild game, which have high purine levels and contribute to high levels of uric acid
  • Limit serving sizes of beef, lamb, pork and processed meats
  • Moderate your intake of higher purine seafood such as anchovies, shellfish, sardines and tuna
  • Avoid alcohol during gout attacks and limit alcohol, especially beer, between attacks
  • Avoid foods and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup. This means soda, sweetened cereals, bakery goods and candies.  High-fructose corn syrup is present is many commercial food products so learn to read labels.
  • Limit consumption of naturally sweet fruit juices
  • Cut back on saturated fats from red meat, fatty poultry, processed meats and high-fat dairy products
  • Eat More lower sugar fruits, vegetables and whole grains which provide complex carbohydrates. Berries are lower sugar fruits with fiber and citrus fruits are another good choice.
  • Vitamin C. Vitamin C may lower uric acid levels.  You can add Vitamin C to your diet with citrus fruits and you may want to talk to your doctor about adding a 500 milligram Vitamin C supplement.
  • Some research suggests that drinking caffeinated coffee in moderation may be associated with a reduced risk of gout.
  • Cherries and Tart Cherry Juice. Tart cherries have long been used as a natural pain killer and are particularly effective against gout. Tart cherries and sweet cherries are different.  Cherries have been shown to lower levels of uric acid in the blood which is one of the most common causes of gout pain.  Look for tart cherry juice at the grocery or health food store (Knudsen is a common brand) and get in the habit of having a small glass each day. Tart cherry juice is, well you know: It is straight up juice, no added sugar or other ingredients.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG.  Get After It.

 

I share my thoughts with you to provide information and food for thought aka pondering. Pondering which will lead to more reading, education and Eureka! moments. However, please don’t take it as medical advice. It isn’t. If you have a medical condition, or suspect you have one, always seek care from a licensed medical professional. That way — it’s all BAMtastic! 

 

Chamayne – Why She Runs

This is a guest blog from my friend, Chamayne Metcalfe Johnson.  Chamayne and I graduated from high school together in 1981 and are 55 this year.  Age 55 may not be the same as it was for our mothers, but the years tick on for all of us.  One thing that is  different for us is that we are better equipped to change up our habits so that we can be stronger and healthier as we age.  This is Chamayne’s story.

I did indeed have a very special birthday this year. I ran my first 5K race — at age 55.  I placed 5th in my age group and only started running 3 months ago.

Here’s the story: After steadfastly refusing for years, um…decades, when asked by friends, I started running on August 22, 2018. Well, maybe more like shuffle-jogging at times but still…

I had never run in my entire life. And I do mean never. In high school and into my 20’s, I was what most people might consider to be fairly fit and “athletic.” However, there’s a big difference in being “athletic” and being an athlete. I was not an athlete. I never participated in organized sports teams, never had a coach making me run, and therefore, I.NEVER.RAN. EV-ER. And in my 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, well….enough said.

But then…

For the last two summers, for some unknown reason, I’d wake up and see the sun shining, hear the birds singing, and have a real urge to hop out of bed, go out the back door, and actually run. I never did it, but something was just there — a nudging, an itch, a restlessness.

I ran into a teaching friend a couple of weeks into school who made changes to his lifestyle for the sake of his health and because of his loved ones, so that he’d be here for them. He told me that every day, he looks in the mirror, points at himself, and says, “You will NOT be a sorry ass!” For some reason, that hit me hard. It began to motivate even the stubborn no-I’m-never-gonna-run me. It resonated and stuck with me.

The final piece of the puzzle, the determining factor, the catalyst… Kenny. My sweet husband has coal miner’s pneumoconiosis…black lung disease.  He is also a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma survivor. He’d give anything to have his health back, to breathe easily. He’d love to be able to inhale our beautiful mountain air deeply and exhale fully until his scarred belly is concave. He’d love to run. He can’t, but by golly….I can.  And so I am.

All of those things just came together in God’s perfect timing and I made my mind up to start one day after school. I’m doing it. Running. I’m more tortoise than hare, but I am a runner now. I love it. I’ve fallen for it hook, line, and sinker. I’ll probably never be fast but then that’s not my goal anyway.

My goal is not to waste the health that God has so graciously bestowed upon me. I’ve been so very blessed with strong legs, healthy lungs, a heart that’s still beating, and eyes and ears that can gaze upon the majesty of nature and hear the beauty of birdsong as I run.

My goal is to be healthy, to be here for my loved ones. My husband needs me, my mother needs me, my son needs me. I’m doing it for me, for them, and for those who can’t.

I’m doing it for my mother, who due to ulcerative colitis, grief, and other concerns, is in very poor health and begs me to do whatever I must to stay healthy, maintain good balance, prevent falls, and promote strong muscles and bones.

I’m doing it for my mom’s lifelong best friend who’s had two total knee replacements.

I’m doing it for Mamaw, who, before her death, was crippled and confined to a wheelchair by degenerative osteoporosis.

I’m doing it for my brother, Britt, who died by suicide. I think of him often as I run here on the farm.

I’m doing it for Daddy and Pappy who died of heart disease.

I’m doing it for Papaw, Memmy, and my cousin Karen, who each died from stroke complications.

I’m doing it to set a good example for my and Kenny’s kids and grandkids.

I’m doing it to encourage others, especially anyone who’s never run before, anyone in their 40’s, 50’s, or 60’s…anyone who’s never really been active and thinks it’s too late. It’s not! No matter your age, young or old, teenager or grandparent, you CAN make a change. If I can do it, you can do it.

When I first started, Wednesday, August 22, 2018, I didn’t even know if I COULD run. I truly didn’t know if it was possible at 54 years, 11 months, and 6 days old. I have beginning cataracts, damaged cervical vertebrae from a car accident, spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, scoliosis curvature from childhood, arthritic-like joints at times, and numerous kidney stones just waiting to be jarred about and send me to the ER again. Not to mention, zero cardiovascular stamina.

I solicited the help of my friend Erica. She and another friend started back in January, asked me to join them, and I practically laughed in their faces as I categorically refused, saying, “This ole gal don’t run!” Oh, but I ate those words, incorrect grammar and all, and now needed advice on apps and some “coaching.”

I started the Fitness22 5K app, an eight-week program. You run 3 times per week, building up run time. You always start each run with 5 minutes walking to warm up and end with 5 minutes walking to cool down. Between warm up and cool down, you alternate run time with walk time. For instance, Week 1 Day 1 is: 1 minute run/1.5 minute walk, 6 times. That’s it. Sounds doable, right?

Guess what? I thought I’d DIE trying to run ONE MINUTE. Yes, 60 seconds! It was awful, even with 1.5 minutes walking in between. But I stuck it out. I did the next day and next day and the next day, week after week. If I couldn’t finish one of the training runs, I’d repeat it again until I could accomplish it before moving on to the next level. At the end of the 5K app, you’ve built up to running 35 minutes non-stop with no walking in between. (I’ve actually worked up to 53 minutes and over 3 miles a few times.)

So, I started running literally 60 seconds at a time, gasping for breath like a galloping horse, and today, I completed a 5K, running the whole way, never walking one step and never stopping one time.

I can’t wait to do it again.       ~  Chamayne

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are one of the “good” types of fat that blunt inflammatory responses. They may help lower the risk of heart disease, depression, dementia, and arthritis. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential nutrients; like all other essential nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, they are used routinely by the body in critical metabolic functions. In the case of omega-3 fats, they are incorporated into cell membranes and are a major construction material for a large family of hormones known as prostaglandins.   Prostaglandins are, among other things, regulators of the immune system and the body’s inflammatory responses. Some classes of fat, including most omega-6 fats, are used to construct prostaglandins that accentuate inflammatory responses. The prostaglandins manufactured from omega-3s tend to help weaken such responses, and this is why fish oil is often called “anti-inflammatory” because it leads to the manufacture of hormones that blunt inflammatory responses.

Where can you find them?

 FISH & SEAFOOD

  • Salmon (Wild Alaskan Salmon is best)
  • Arctic Char
  • Sardines
  • Halibut
  • Mackerel
  • Tuna
  • Rainbow Trout
  • Anchovies
  • Oysters
  • Shrimp
  • Mussels
  • Crab
  • Cod

Those are the fish and seafood that are highest in Omega 3s.  However, eating any variety of fish that lived in the sea or rivers and lakes that are abundant with a variety of algae will reward you with some Omega 3s.

FISH OIL SUPPLEMENTS

You are looking for at least 500 mg of EPA and DPA per dosage, not the total amount of Omega 3 fish oil used to make the product (which is what the label usually highlights)Fish oil supplements from Nordic waters are noted to be especially high quality.  Single source Cod Liver Oil is also an option. Brands that I recommend:   Carlson’s and Nordic Naturals

SEA PLANTS 

“Seaweed” is the common name for countless species of marine plants and algae that grow in the ocean as well as in rivers, lakes, and other water bodies.

  •  Kelp
  • Kombu
  • Wakame
  • Dulse
  • Nori

NUTS and SEEDS

  • Walnuts
  • Chia seeds
  • Flax seeds (ground or grind the whole seeds yourself)
  • Pumpkin (pepita) seeds

OILS

  • Cod Liver oil
  • Flax Seed oil
  • Walnut oil
  • Mustard oil [can be found in Indian food stores]

 Try mustard oil in salads instead of olive oil; dark leafy greens such as spinach and kale have Omega 3s

VEGETABLES & FRUIT

Dark leafy greens

  •  Spinach
  •  Kale
  • Collards
  • Broccoli rabe

Cruciferous vegetables

  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts

Winter Squash

Berries

  • Blackberries
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries
  •  Blueberries
  • Mangoes

Honeydew Melon

SPICES & HERBS

Virtually all herbs and spices have a great Omega 3 to Omega 6 ratio; the ones with highest Omega 3s:

  • Oregano
  • Marjoram
  • Tarragon
  • Cloves

Cortisol & Lowering Your Stress Levels

Cortisol is a stress-induced chemical that is produced by the adrenal glands. This “stress hormone” helps regulate blood pressure and the immune system during a sudden crisis, whether a physical attack or an emotional setback. This helps you to tap into your energy reserves and increases your ability to fight off infection.  The trouble is, relentless stress can keep this survival mechanism churning in high gear, subverting the hormone’s good intentions. Chronically high cortisol levels can cause sleep problems, a depressed immune response, blood sugar abnormalities, and weight gain (especially in the abdominal area).  When cortisol spikes, it tells the body to eat something with a lot of calories—a great survival tactic if you need energy to flee a predator but not if you’re fretting over how to pay bills. You don’t have to “feel” stressed out for your body to be stressed.

Fortunately, an antidote to the body’s fight-or-flight mode has evolved:  the relaxation response.  Here are some things to manage stress that can reduce your cortisol levels and get your body (and your mind & spirit) chilled out.

  • Breathing / Mindfulness Meditation
    • Check out the CALM app or Deepak Chopra’s Meditations
  • Sleep
    • Take a Nap
    • Go to bed earlier
    • Improve sleep hygiene practices
  • Laugh
    • Hang out with a funny friend
    • Comedy – watch a movie; head out to a comedy club
    • Read or listen to a “mindlessly” funny book and escape the world for a while
  • Book a Massage

In addition to keeping cortisol under control, massage sessions reduce stress by promoting production of dopamine and serotonin

  • Cut back or eliminate sugary and heavy-duty caffeinated beverages such as energy drinks

These beverages spike cortisol levels almost immediately

  • Reduce the amount of processed foods in your diet
    • White bread and pasta; candy, cookies, snack cakes, etc.

Processed flour & sugary carbs (usually found together) cause a spike in cortisol & increase blood sugar levels which makes you feel anxious

  • Make sure you are drinking enough water

Just a half-liter of dehydration can raise cortisol levels. Stress can cause dehydration, and dehydration can cause stress. If your urine is darker colored, it’s probably a sign that you’re not drinking enough water. Adequately-hydrated individuals have urine that is light, almost water-like, in appearance.

  • Add more Omega 3 fatty acids into your diet
  • Brew up some black tea

The “cup that cheers” has deep associations with comfort and calm—just think of how the English revere their late-afternoon teatime. As it turns out, science confirms the connection: When volunteers at University College London were given a stressful task, the cortisol levels of those who were regular black-tea drinkers fell by 47% within an hour of completing the assignment. Study author Andrew Steptoe, PhD, suspects that naturally occurring chemicals such as polyphenols and flavonoids may be responsible for tea’s calming effects.

  • Low Intensity / Relaxing Exercise
    • Yoga. Pilates. Tai Chi.
  • Listen to Relaxing Music
  • Sit down with a Coloring book and Crayons
  • Head outside and spend some time with Nature
    • Stretch out and relax in a field of daisies and just enjoy the sun and gentle breeze on your face
    • Lie in a hammock under the stars
    • Grab some binoculars and head out for some bird watching

Get Your Morning Started Right

Looking ahead to the day?  Here are 4 things that you can do each morning to get your day started & give your body and mind some Oomph.

1. STRETCH before you get out of bed. Move those joints (ankles, knees, hips, wrists, elbows, shoulders, neck)  and those big muscle muscle groups ( legs, chest, back) and when you swing your legs over to finally stand up: stretch toward the sky.

2. OPEN the blinds & let daylight in.

3. DRINK a glass of cold water. Your body hasn’t had hydration for hours and the cold water will give your body both hydration & oomph. Note: we walk around dehydrated a lot of the time – our brains, lungs, heart , liver, muscles ( you name it!)need hydration, they need straight up water. Our Metabolism needs water!

4. EXERCISE a wee bit after you have water, but before you take a shower or eat breakfast. I’m not talking a full out workout , I’m talking movement & exercise. Walk up & down your driveway. Intentionally walk stairs a few times. Do some jumping jacks        (seated or standing). Dance to a favorite upbeat song.  Ride a stationary bike. 10 minutes – you’ve got it in you !

 

STAY Healthy. Be STRONG.  Get AFTER IT!

Love for your Body, Mind & Spirit

Warmer weather is nudging its way to us and getting outside on a regular basis will be a reality that I encourage to embrace.  The simple act of walking has so many health benefits that if the pharmaceutical companies could capture all the benefits and stuff them into a capsule they’d surely do it and charge several dollars for a single capsule.

Walking doesn’t require any special training. Most folks can do I and it doesn’t take any equipment other than a decent pair of shoes.  You can walk at the park, around town, around the block in your neighborhood, around the perimeter of your parking lot at work on your lunch break, around the inside of a large store or shopping mall (just don’t stop to shop – keep on walking! – then shop).   30 minutes of exercise per days does so many good things for our bodies, minds and spirits. Start at your fitness level.  Walking at a slow pace is fine if that is where you are; challenge yourself to increase the intensity so that you are eventually walking at a pace that talking is possible, but you can’t carry on a chatty conversation with someone.

Let’s list a few things that WALKING can do for you:

  • Strengthens your BONES
  • Strengthens your HEART
  • LOWERS disease risk
  • Keeps WEIGHT in check
  • Can help prevent DEMENTIA
  • Gives you ENERGY
  • It makes you HAPPY

WHOA!  Did you just read that?

Regular walking has been shown to reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. It lowers levels of LDL (“bad” cholesterol) while increasing levels of HDL (“good” cholesterol) and keeps your blood pressure in check.   A walking habit can reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and can keep insulin resistance in check. Insulin resistance is a precursor to diabetes and plays a role in many chronic health conditions.  Active walkers have around a 20% lowered risk of developing cancer of the colon, breast and uterus.  30 minutes a day. That’s all you need to reap these benefits.

Walking uses calories – you are expending energy.  Walking is weight bearing so it stimulates and strengthens bones, increasing their density. This is especially important for women.  Post-Menopausal women are at greater risk for osteoporosis. Research shows that post-menopausal women who walk approximately 1 mile per day have higher bone density than women who don’t walk.   Walking helps maintain healthy joints and that is bad news for arthritis.  Walking strengthens and shapes your leg muscles, giving definition to calves, quads, and hamstrings and gives OOMPH to your glutes – especially if you add hills.  If you pay attention to your posture as you walk, your core muscles will get in on the benefits too.

Speed walking comes from your arms.  Hold them at a comfortable level at your waist, bent at the elbow, and swing them backwards and forwards as your walk.  Swing them faster and you’ll automatically speed up.  That movement is working the muscles of your arms, shoulders and upper back.  Using all those muscles challenges them and the more muscle we have and use, the more calories we burn, even at rest.

A brisk walk is one of the best natural energizers.  Walking boosts circulation and increases oxygen supply to every cell in our bodies, helping us to feel more alert and alive.  Think about that the next time you find yourself plopped down on the couch watching TV bemoaning that you “never have time” or are “too tired” to exercise. Get up, lace up the shoes and walk for 15 minutes. I guarantee that you will feel better.   Those 15 minutes will become 20, then 30.   Walking can clear a cluttered mind.  Walking alleviates stress and symptoms of depression.  Exercise releases “feel good” endorphins into the bloodstream, reducing stress and anxiety.

Physical activity has a protective effect on brain function and regular exercise can help us avoid brain shrinkage and preserve memory as the years pass.  Dementia affects one in 14 people over age 65 and one in 6 over age 80.   A study from Harvard a few years ago looked at walking and its many benefits.  That study found that later in life, walking becomes as much an INDICATOR of health as a PROMOTER of it.  After age 65, how fast you walk may predict how long you have to live. Researchers have found a consistent association between faster walking speed and a longer life.  Can you get your shoes on fast enough for a longer life with more memory?

In a nutshell:  Walking improves physical and mental function and it makes us feel GOOD.

Stay Healthy. Be Strong. Get After It.

Eating for Arthritis

Arthritis pain and stiffness can make you feel that you don’t want to move, so you find yourself sitting more and moving less. That seems like the thing to do, but it isn’t.  Our joints need movement.   When healthy joints move, the bones glide against one another little friction due to a layer of slick articular cartilage and slippery synovial fluid.  Synovial fluid provides cushion and lubrication for the joints. When a joint is at rest, cartilage absorbs some of the synovial fluid. When the joint is in use the synovial fluid is squeezed out of the cartilage; moving our joints is essential to circulate the synovial fluid.  Gently moving the joints for 10 minutes each morning will start your day off with less stiffness and can lessen pain when you continue to move throughout the day.  Even if you are sitting, you can be moving your joints.  Exercise that is joint friendly without impact to the joints is essential and all it takes is your body, a chair and some music.  Ok, music is optional, but it gets you in the movement mood.  Ageless Grace® and chair Yoga are some suggestions.

FOOD.  What we put into our bodies matter.  Food is indeed medicine.  A basic place to start is eating more fruits, vegetables and whole grains that you must cook to eat combined with crowding processed sugars out of your life. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition warns that processed sugars trigger the release of inflammatory messengers called cytokines. Sugar goes by many names so look out for any word ending in “ose” in ingredient labels.  Sugar is added to so many commercially prepared foods, many that you wouldn’t expect.  White flour products (bread, rolls, crackers and many cereals) are refined and lack fiber. These foods fuel the production of advanced glycation end (AGE) products that stimulate inflammation.

Beyond those basics, add more Omega-3 fatty acids to your life.  Omega-3s blunt inflammatory responses that may help lower the risk of arthritis, dementia, heart disease and depression. Prostaglandins are regulators of the immune system and the body’s inflammatory responses.  Omega-3s help weaken inflammatory responses while Omega-6 fats increase inflammatory responses.  When tend to get more Omega-6 fats in our diet due to convenience foods, and we don’t get enough Omega-3s.

Where can you find Omega-3s? Seaweed is the primary source – countless species of marine plants and algae that grow in the ocean as well as in rivers, lakes, and other water bodies. Fish eat seaweed so that is why the oil extracted from fatty fish is rich in Omega-3s.  That is why fish oil supplements are used to boost Omega-3 intake. If using a fish-oil supplement, look for at least 500 mg of EPA and DPA per dosage, not the total amount of Omega 3 fish oil used to make the product (which is what the front label usually highlights). Read the back of the label to get this information.

Fish oil supplements from Nordic waters are noted to be especially high quality.  Single source Cod Liver Oil is a good option.  Brands that I recommend are Carlson’s and Nordic Naturals.  A supplement is only as good as its quality and our body’s ability to absorb it.

Eating more fish and seafood is an excellent way to get more Omega-3 fats. The fattier the fish, the richer it is in Omega-3s.  Best choices are: Wild Alaskan Salmon, Arctic Char, Sardines, Halibut, Mackerel, Tuna, Rainbow Trout, Cod, Anchovies, Oysters, Shrimp, Mussels and Crab. However, eating any variety of fish that lived in the sea or rivers and lakes that are abundant with a variety of algae will reward you with some Omega 3s.

Nuts and Seeds also have some Omega-3s. Walnuts have the greatest amount. Chia seeds, Flax seeds (ground or grind the whole seeds yourself) and Pumpkin (pepita) seeds also are good sources.  Flax seed oil, Walnut oil and Mustard oil are also rich sources. Mustard oil can be found in Indian food stores. Try mustard oil in salads instead of olive oil. Dark leafy greens such as spinach and kale have Omega-3s; try a salad made with those greens and mustard oil for an Omega-3 punch.

Vegetables and Fruit also contain Omega-3s. The richest sources are: dark leafy greens such as spinach, kale, collards and broccoli rabe.  Cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, Winter squash, Berries, Mangoes and Honeydew melon.

 In summary, eat less processed sugar and commercial baked goods. Eat more vegetables and fruit especially leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables and berries. Eat more fish. Eat more walnuts, chia seeds, flax seeds and pumpkin seeds. Consider taking a high-quality fish oil supplement or a vegan algae supplement.  Get movement into your life and your joints every single day.

Stay HEALTHY. Be STRONG. Get AFTER It.

I’ve wrecked my train

In the years of March 2011 – January 2017 I ate a total of 2 doughnuts.  I ate 2 doughnuts this past Friday. I ate 2 doughnuts on Thursday. I ate 2 doughnuts and a bear claw on Wednesday.  I’ve eaten doughnuts all darn year.  Every time I ate one I told myself not to eat it, but I did it anyway.  I didn’t take myself seriously when I said not to.  You see, food is my drug of choice. Doughnuts is a symbol of my struggle.  I push back against the words “food addiction”.  However, yes, I am a food addict.   Foods with the combo of sugar, fat and flour are my drugs.   There is no such thing as “moderation” when it comes to drugs so why do we try to fool ourselves into thinking we can let the food that doesn’t serve us well into our lives.

You see, I had it under control.  I lulled myself into thinking I could let up off the brake and give it a little gas.  I do see that some difficult, stressful life situations pulled me back and I allowed it. Oh.. it was slow.   A little more gas here and there until BAM! I’ve wrecked my train.

I do see things that occurred in my young life from about the age of 4 through my teens that started me on the path of an unhealthy relationship with food.  If I allow myself to peel back the curtain and take a look, I know. It isn’t easy to look, but it’s important to do so.  It is also important not to allow those things to control you and your relationship with food for your entire life.  We do have the power to choose and take control. However, often we must take an unvarnished look at the whys, own up to the reality and choose to move forward with some positive action. We cannot stay in “victim mode”.  To do so relinquishes too much power.

So here I am a few days shy of age 54 and I’m finding myself fighting the same battle – again.  I’m armed with lots of education, history and knowledge of what I need to do, what I must do, what I have successfully done in the past.  Now I must implement it.  Is it easy?  Heck no. Is it possible?  Heck yes.  Is it difficult in terms of complexity?  No. Does it require effort to consistently execute?  Of course.   Worth it?  Oh yes.  Giving up because I wrecked my train?  Oh No!  Blaming anyone or anything else but myself? Nope.  Victim mode is not engaged.  Am I beautiful, smart and worthy of love just the way I am?  Of course.  Blinders on to being fatter than I want and need to be and needing to course correct?  No way.

Are your blinders on?

If you need support, guidance and professional assistance then GET IT.

Stay Healthy. Be STRONG.  Get After It.